Icelandic Horizon

comments 23
Impressionism / Inspiration / Photo Log / Photography / Seascapes

_DSC9892_DxO11FC1Bolg

January 24, 2020 — Londrangar View Point, Snaefellsjökull Peninsula, Iceland

Minimalist horizon on a cold, cold day.

(Nikon D850, Tamron SP 24–70mm f/2.8 Di VC USD G2. ISO 64, 20 sec at f/16; 6-stop neutral density filter. RAW processing in DxO PhotoLab 3.1; Editing in Adobe Photoshop.)

For more Seascape Horizons, see amagaphoto.com

The Author

California based fine-art photographer featuring abstract, impressionist, and minimalist seascapes — near and distant — and floral-based images. Fine-art photography can be seen at www.amagaphoto.com All original images on this blog are copyright 2018, 2019, 2020 Michael Scandling. All rights reserved. No images on this site may be copied, duplicated, reused, published, or re-purposed in any way without express permission from the copyright owner, Michael Scandling.

23 Comments

  1. Certainly looks icy cold, even a bit ominous yet surprisingly serene! I get a feeling that this place invokes very contrasting impressions … but always inspiringly beautiful. Gorgeous shot!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks very much. A big part of the depth is the 20-second exposure, which softened everything. Condensation happens when you come in from the cold. Then it can be an issue. The camera just has to gradually warm up. It’s a good idea to carry microfiber towels. (According to the Hitchhiker’s Guide, it’s always a good idea to bring a towel.)

      Liked by 1 person

    • You can compare them to the ones on my website, almost all of which are shot in California:

      http://www.amagaphoto.com

      Here is what I’ve discovered so far: all ocean horizons look pretty much the same providing climate, weather, light, and ocean current conditions are comparable. This is based on my experience in California, Oregon, England, and Portugal. And now Iceland. What’s different about this is the overall color of the water. I believe that comes from two things: a lot of glacial flour in the water, and the fact that the sun is so low on the horizon which results in an overall color shift.

      Liked by 1 person

      • It’s hard to judge, but the Iceland blues seem greener than the CA blues. That would agree with glacial detritus being in the water, I think – at least up here, glaciers make the water quite green.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Kind of a blue-green teal. Fascinating color. Look at a satellite photograph of Lake Pukaki in the center of the Southern Island of New Zealand. Fed completely by glacier runoff. That’s more turquoise.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s